Celebrating the Wonders of our Natural World...






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RARE

Wildlife conservation is a top priority at John Ball Zoo and to raise awareness about animals that are endangered and vulnerable, the Zoo is hosting R.A.R.E. (Really Awesome. Really Endangered). It’s a 65 day promotion that is designed to draw attention to just a few of the many animals in the world that are facing habitat loss, poaching, disease and pollution. R.A.R.E. kicks off Tuesday, July 16 with BEAR DAY. BEAR DAY will celebrate bears with a Teddy Bear Clinic with the Zoo vet, a scavenger hunt for prizes and several bear demonstrations. The Grizzly Bear will be the first species to be honored during R.A.R.E. Every subsequent day will honor a different species. Although there are thousands of vulnerable and endangered animals worldwide, John Ball Zoo felt it important to select animals that are in their own collection or those that have been helped through the John Ball Zoo Society Wildlife Conservation Fund (look for the WCF designation below).

9/12/13

WCF

Eastern Box Turtle
This turtle can live up to 80 years old! They can travel huge distances in search of food. Habitat destruction, motor vehicle accidents and climate change have caused the box turtle population to decline. The JBZS Conservation Fund funded an operation to monitor movements, identify population structures, and conduct a health assessment in its natural habitat for the purpose of learning more about this turtle and ensuring a successful future.
Eastern Box Turtle

9/13/13

Chaco Tortoise
CHACO TORTOISE - The chaco tortoise is in trouble because their eggs must be protected for 12 - 16 months and that's a long time to protect a nest. The male chaco will, however, be very aggressive! The chaco hails from Argentina and Paraguay and falls victim to the pet trade and a depleting food source due to habitat destruction.
Chaco Tortoise

9/14/13

Blandings Turtle
This turtle has an odd way of catching its food. It rapidly thrusts its head at it. This turtle is one of the few turtles that hibernates completely underwater ! They are endangered due to road mortality and the pet trade.

Blandings Turtle

9/15/13

WCF

Spider Monkey
Despite their lack of thumbs, spider monkeys spend most of their time living in the trees, but keep a tight, tight, grip on the branches with their fingers and prehensile tail! The spider monkey is endangered due to hunting, and land clearing for logging. The JBZS Wildlife Conservation Fund supports a Mexican Zoo-based project that manages two native spider monkey species for the purpose of helping them survive!!

Spider Monkey

9/6/13

Dourocouli
Also known as the "owl monkey" this species is the only fully nocturnal monkey species. During the day they tend to look for holes in trees or hollowed out stumps. Pictured here is the JBZ owl monkey peeking out of a log in his exhibit. Habitat loss is the biggest concern for these guys - like most primate species.
Douricouli

9/17/13

WCF

Cotton Top Tamarin
These little primates run using all four legs - just like a horse gallop! They primarily eat insects, fruit and plants, but they have also been seen eating an occasional reptile or amphibian! The cotton-top tamarin is one of the most endangered primates IN THE WORLD. They are challenged with rapid destruction of its habitat by deforestation. The JBZS Wildlife Conservation Fund awarded funds to a S. American organization that offers conservation classes for those living near the Cotton Top Tamarin.
Cotton Top Tamarin

9/18/13

Goeldi's Monkey
These guys live in
extended family groups made up of a breeding pair (mom and dad) and offspring. The offspring remain in the group, even into adulthood, to help care for their younger siblings. These 'helpers' gain valuable breeding experience while they are waiting for a suitable mate and territory of their own. The forest where these monkey live is under continual threat of deforestation for logging, farming, oil and gas enterprises.
Goeldi's Monkey